This Earth Day You Can Help Clean up the World's Oceans From Home Just by Watching 'Trash TV'

Free The Ocean, a brand dedicated to removing plastic pollution from the seas, is launching a new kind of "Trash TV" just in time for Earth Day.

The brand has already redefined what it means to be an eco-activist. Mimi Ausland, the co-founder and CEO of Free The Ocean, had the idea to mix gaming with doing a little good while living in San Diego and seeing the devastating effects of plastic pollution along our shores first-hand. So, she created a website where people can come and answer a quick trivia question and "remove" one piece of trash from the sea for every answer. Don't worry, even wrong answers count.

"Having removed over 15 million pieces of plastic to date, Free The Ocean exists to inspire the use of less plastic, educate on the issue of plastic pollution, and empower people to realize the collective impact of small, meaningful actions," the company shared in a statement.

For Earth Day, the company is upping the ante by releasing an entirely new channel that will stream the 8 million tons of plastic dumped in the ocean each year. And, just as the daily trivia click helps Free The Ocean fund the removal of plastics, viewing the show will also trigger the removal of plastic as well.

Here's how it works: First, answer Free the Ocean's daily trivia question. One click equals one piece of plastic removed. Next, watch a bit of the live-streaming "Trash TV." Once again, one view equals one piece of plastic removed.

Curious how clicks and views turn into action? The company explained, "advertising revenue generated on Free The Ocean goes directly to fund its impact partners, Sustainable Coastlines Hawaii and The Ocean Cleanup. Both groups remove and transport plastic to recycling centers, and create innovative ways to repurpose plastic into new products, like sunglasses, soap dispensers, and skateboard decks."

It's that simple. Take 30 seconds this Earth Day and know your easy little clicks can make a massive difference.

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