See Inside Italy's Ghost Villages

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Slide 1 of 19: Amendolea was abandoned in the 1950s after a flood.
Slide 2 of 19: This small island in the Venice Lagoon was once a navy radio station, later became private property, and was eventually abandoned completely.
Slide 3 of 19: The last families of Narbona vacated the town in the 1960s.
Slide 4 of 19: Giuseppe Spagnuolo is the last resident of Roscigno Vecchia in southern Italy. Most people left because of dangerous landslides.
Slide 5 of 19: Scurati was vacated in the 1950s and has since been the backdrop for staging television shows and nativity scenes.
Slide 6 of 19: Families left Monterano in 1799 after a violent looting by the French army.
Slide 7 of 19: The ancient castle settlement of Toiano is nestled among Tuscany's rolling hills.
Slide 8 of 19: The ghost town of Poggioreale fell into disrepair following a series of earthquakes in the 1960s.
Slide 9 of 19: A ghost house is surrounded by the lush hills of Montevecchio, an old mining site in Sardinia.
Slide 10 of 19: When the mine of Montevecchio closed in the 1991, many miners left their homes.
Slide 11 of 19: The medieval town of Craco emptied in the late 20th century due to landslides.
Slide 12 of 19: Residents left Col di Favilla in the 1960s after the construction of a new road diverted the flow of commercial traffic away from the village.
Slide 13 of 19: Villaggio Asproni once hosted workers from the nearby mines, and fell into disuse when they closed.
Slide 14 of 19: Items clutter a ghost house in the Piedmont region. Its last resident is believed to have died about 20 years ago.
Slide 15 of 19: Today, local shepherds use the abandoned buildings in Villaggio Asproni to house livestock.
Slide 16 of 19: Paint peals from the interior of a building in Poggioreale, abandoned following a series of earthquakes in the 1960s.
Slide 17 of 19: The hilltop fortress of Rocca Calascio was damaged by an earthquake in 1703.
Slide 18 of 19: Vegetation overtakes a ghost house in the Piedmont region of northwest Italy.
Slide 19 of 19: Monteruga was built during Italy's fascist regime and abandoned in the 1980s.

Amendolea was abandoned in the 1950s after a flood.

This small island in the Venice Lagoon was once a navy radio station, later became private property, and was eventually abandoned completely.

The last families of Narbona vacated the town in the 1960s.

Giuseppe Spagnuolo is the last resident of Roscigno Vecchia in southern Italy. Most people left because of dangerous landslides.

Scurati was vacated in the 1950s and has since been the backdrop for staging television shows and nativity scenes.

Families left Monterano in 1799 after a violent looting by the French army.

The ancient castle settlement of Toiano is nestled among Tuscany’s rolling hills.

The ghost town of Poggioreale fell into disrepair following a series of earthquakes in the 1960s.

A ghost house is surrounded by the lush hills of Montevecchio, an old mining site in Sardinia.

When the mine of Montevecchio closed in the 1991, many miners left their homes.

The medieval town of Craco emptied in the late 20th century due to landslides.

Residents left Col di Favilla in the 1960s after the construction of a new road diverted the flow of commercial traffic away from the village.

Villaggio Asproni once hosted workers from the nearby mines, and fell into disuse when they closed.

Items clutter a ghost house in the Piedmont region. Its last resident is believed to have died about 20 years ago.

Today, local shepherds use the abandoned buildings in Villaggio Asproni to house livestock.

Paint peals from the interior of a building in Poggioreale, abandoned following a series of earthquakes in the 1960s.

The hilltop fortress of Rocca Calascio was damaged by an earthquake in 1703.

Vegetation overtakes a ghost house in the Piedmont region of northwest Italy.

Monteruga was built during Italy’s fascist regime and abandoned in the 1980s.

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